Can Autism Be Cured?

“Can autism be cured?” is a common question that parents or guardians have after their child is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, and the short answer is no: most experts agree that there is no cure for autism. Thinking about autism as something that can be “cured” or as a problem to be “fixed” can be harmful to your child’s emotional well-being and can help perpetuate harmful stereotypes about people with autism.

Your child simply experiences the world differently than you do, and they may need some extra support to navigate their everyday lives and thrive independently. There are plenty of ways to support your child as they grow, and here are just a few.

How to Support Your Child

Find Autism Treatments

Find Autism Treatments

Once you have that diagnosis, it’s important to seek the assistance of trusted experts who can help you navigate the different treatments available for autism. Starting therapy as soon as possible is crucial for children with autism, and early intervention services are available for this exact reason. Although some of its more 

outdated methods have faced controversy in the past, ABA therapy has long been considered the gold standard of autism treatment.

Pediatric and adolescent psychiatrists can also help to treat other conditions that often co-occur alongside ASD, like obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Since these disorders impact your child’s behaviors, they’re important to address alongside ASD. Depending on your doctors’ recommendation, your child may benefit from ABA therapy, occupational therapy, or speech therapy — or all three.

Research Regarding Autism

Keep Informed

There are many myths circulating regarding autism, and some are more damaging than others. Take the time to find credible sources and educate yourself. It’s important to stay informed not just of current research regarding autism — such as studies investigating dietary and lifestyle modifications, for example — but to do your

own research and do your part to help dispel these myths.

For example, a common myth is that people with autism have a shorter life expectancy. This is simply not true, but the reason the average is skewed is because of one critical caveat: people with autism are statistically more prone to accidental deaths. This is especially true for children who wander, which is a common behavior in many children with autism; as they tend to be drawn to water, drowning is a major concern. Knowing this will allow you to take preventative measures, like fencing in your yard or ensuring your child takes swimming lessons.

Support Your Child

Practice Self-Care

Caring for any child does not come without obstacles, and caring for a child with autism can lead to additional challenges you may not have anticipated. You may feel stressed or overwhelmed a lot of the time, and it may feel selfish to take time for yourself, but trust us: by supporting yourself, you are supporting your child.

Maybe you have grandparents or other trusted babysitters on hand when you need a few moments to yourself. If not, we offer Parents’ Night Out events as part of our Support Groups, where our experienced therapists and technicians will keep an eye on your little ones so you can take the night off and recharge. You can’t pour from an empty cup, and one of the best ways you can support your child with autism is to make sure you look after yourself.

Find Autism Treatments

Once you have that diagnosis, it’s important to seek the assistance of trusted experts who can help you navigate the different treatments available for autism. Starting therapy as soon as possible is crucial for children with autism, and early intervention services are available for this exact reason. Although some of its more outdated methods have faced controversy in the past, ABA therapy has long been considered the gold standard of autism treatment.

Pediatric and adolescent psychiatrists can also help to treat other conditions that often co-occur alongside ASD, like obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Since these disorders impact your child’s behaviors, they’re important to address alongside ASD. Depending on your doctors’ recommendation, your child may benefit from ABA therapy, occupational therapy, or speech therapy — or all three.

Keep Informed

There are many myths circulating regarding autism, and some are more damaging than others. Take the time to find credible sources and educate yourself. It’s important to stay informed not just of current research regarding autism — such as studies investigating dietary and lifestyle modifications, for example — but to do your own research and do your part to help dispel these myths.

For example, a common myth is that people with autism have a shorter life expectancy. This is simply not true, but the reason the average is skewed is because of one critical caveat: people with autism are statistically more prone to accidental deaths. This is especially true for children who wander, which is a common behavior in many children with autism; as they tend to be drawn to water, drowning is a major concern. Knowing this will allow you to take preventative measures, like fencing in your yard or ensuring your child takes swimming lessons.

Practice Self-Care

Caring for any child does not come without obstacles, and caring for a child with autism can lead to additional challenges you may not have anticipated. You may feel stressed or overwhelmed a lot of the time, and it may feel selfish to take time for yourself, but trust us: by supporting yourself, you are supporting your child.

Maybe you have grandparents or other trusted babysitters on hand when you need a few moments to yourself. If not, we offer Parents’ Night Out events as part of our Support Groups, where our experienced therapists and technicians will keep an eye on your little ones so you can take the night off and recharge. You can’t pour from an empty cup, and one of the best ways you can support your child with autism is to make sure you look after yourself.

Autism Treatment in Cary, NC

If you have any questions about our ABA therapy, parent support groups, or any of our other services at The Cardinal Center for Behavior Analysis, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us at (919) 822-8802 or fill out our contact form to request a confidential consultation today.

Questions?

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